ALTER43



Untitled

I participate in Tumblr on two levels, as a blogger and as an artist. As a member of the blog community, I am the curator and publisher of my own eclectic archive of photography, art, quotes, video and music. As an artist, Tumblr has become the first venue for the exhibition of my own digital images from the groups "Particles and Waves" and "Extrusion Maps." I appreciate the free exchange with other members and the sharing of my collection, as well as the exhibition of my own work within such an easy to use, non-commercial environment.

http://www.douglasprince.com/


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cavetocanvas:

Berenice Abbott, Fifth Avenue, Nos. 4, 6, 8, 1936
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

In 1929, after eight years in Paris, Abbott returned to America, bringing with her an immense collection of photographs by Eugène Atget and the ideas of European modernist photographers. Her first pictures of New York show the modernist influence in the sharply angled viewpoints and tendency toward abstraction. By the mid-1930s, however, Atget emerged as the stronger influence, as Abbott’s style became more straightforward and documentary.
In 1935 Abbott embarked on a series documenting New York funded by the Federal Art Project, and during the next four years she made hundreds of images of the city’s monuments and architecture. Ninety-seven of these, including “Fifth Avenue, Nos. 4, 6, 8,” were published in “Changing New York” (1939). The caption for this picture informs us that “No. 8 was once the home of the art collection which formed a part of the original Metropolitan Museum of Art.”

cavetocanvas:

Berenice Abbott, Fifth Avenue, Nos. 4, 6, 8, 1936

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

In 1929, after eight years in Paris, Abbott returned to America, bringing with her an immense collection of photographs by Eugène Atget and the ideas of European modernist photographers. Her first pictures of New York show the modernist influence in the sharply angled viewpoints and tendency toward abstraction. By the mid-1930s, however, Atget emerged as the stronger influence, as Abbott’s style became more straightforward and documentary.


In 1935 Abbott embarked on a series documenting New York funded by the Federal Art Project, and during the next four years she made hundreds of images of the city’s monuments and architecture. Ninety-seven of these, including “Fifth Avenue, Nos. 4, 6, 8,” were published in “Changing New York” (1939). The caption for this picture informs us that “No. 8 was once the home of the art collection which formed a part of the original Metropolitan Museum of Art.”


Notes
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